Schedule

The South Carolina Association of Prevention Professionals and Advocates (SCAPPA) Certification Commission has approved 21 CEU hours for SCADA.

All sessions have been approved for CEU hours by the Addiction Professionals of South Carolina (APSC) .

Sunday, May 16, 2021

Opening Keynote                                                           

1:00 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

Be A Coffee Bean

Damon West

Sentenced to sixty-five years in a Texas prison, Damon West once had it all. Damon West, M.S. Criminal Justice, is a college professor, nationally known keynote speaker and best-selling author (with best-selling author and motivational speaker Jon Gordon) of The Coffee Bean: A simple Lesson to Create Positive Change. His first book and autobiography, The Change Agent: How a Former College QB Sentenced to Life in Prison Transformed His World, was published just three years after his release from a Texas maximum-security prison.

At 20 years old, he was a Division 1 starting quarterback at the University of North Texas, when he suffered a career ending injury. He turned to drugs to cope with disappointments of life. After graduation, he worked in the United States Congress, was a national fundraiser on a U.S. Presidential campaign and eventually trained to be a stock-broker for United Bank of Switzerland (UBS). One day at UBS, he was introduced to methamphetamines; he became instantly hooked—and the lives of so many innocent people would forever be changed by the choices he made in order to feed his insatiable meth habit.

 

After a fateful discussion during his incarceration with a seasoned convict, Damon had a spiritual awakening. He learned that, like a coffee bean changing with the application of heat and pressure, he was capable of changing the environment around him. Armed with a program of recovery, a renewed faith, and a miraculous second chance at life, Damon emerged from over seven years of prison a changed man. His story of redemption, grit and determination continues to inspire audiences today.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions                               

2:45 p.m. - 5:30 p.m.

The Impact of Compassion Fatigue in

Peer Support Work

Ed Johnson

 

Abstract

Individuals who work with vulnerable populations that have experienced trauma experience Secondary Traumatic Stress (STS). Without intervention, STS results in compassion fatigue.  This didactic and experiential session will increase the awareness of participants related to why Peer Support Workers are especially vulnerable, the factors contributing to Compassion Fatigue and potential warning signs. Participants will explore skills and lifestyle changes that Peer Support Workers can use and make to reduce the risk and impact of Compassion Fatigue.

 

Objectives

  1. Identify who is susceptible to Compassion Fatigue and Secondary Traumatic Stress and how they happen.

  2. Describe how Compassion Fatigue impacts the peer workforce.

  3. Identify steps for prevention and reversal of Compassion Fatigue and addressing Secondary Traumatic Stress.

Leadership is Everyone’s Business 

Alan Lyme

Abstract
In 2014, Jim Kouzes and Barry Posner wrote that the best leaders do not wait to be told by a manager or by someone in human resources that they need to change their behavior. Instead, they take charge of their own learning. Because they are self-aware and they seek feedback, they know their strengths and areas for improvement, and they know what needs to be done. They seek the developmental opportunities they need. If the resources are not available from the organization, they find a way to gain the experience, example, or education some other way. This presentation will focus on one specific path to Leadership that has been practiced and researched for over thirty years: The Leadership Challenge.

Objectives

  1. Define Leadership as it relates to the SUD field.

  2. Discern who leads within your organization.

  3. Discuss the utility of carving a path to the future.

Is Childhood Adversity the Real Gateway Drug?

Abby Wilson

Abstract

The Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACE) Study informs prevention professionals how early life experiences could potentially impact behavioral and physical well-being as an adult. ACE attributable problems include early initiation of smoking, marijuana use and alcohol-related problems. This interactive presentation covers brain development, the ACE Study, and tools to work with your community to bring the focus to prevention.

Objectives:

  1. Participants will be able to list the effects of toxic stress on brain development, particularly in three key areas of the brain. 

  2. Participants can describe the relationship between adverse childhood experiences and adult behavioral and physical outcomes. 

  3. Participants can list at least three core protective systems and describe how they interface with their work. 

Matrix Model of Treatment

Donna Johnson

Abstract
This training will provide attendees an overview of the Matrix Model to better understand the Matrix Program and how it works. Attendees will also have the opportunity to ask specific questions of typical program challenges and clarify any of the program components.  The training is very interactive and promotes attendee discussions.  Attendees will also gain information to determine if they would like to have the full Matrix training for themselves or their agency. 

Objectives

  1. Gain an understanding of the model and what is needed for implementation. 

  2. Utilize the various components in group and individual and family sessions.

  3. Ensure good understanding of the basic Matrix principals.

  4. Review and understand sample client handouts.

  5. Utilizing Key Supervisors as Coaches.

Monday, May 17, 2021
 

Opening Keynote                                                           

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Pandemic Response to Recovery:

Disaster Behavioral Health Lessons

and Responder Resilience

Captain Michael King

Captain Michael King, Ph.D., M.S.W is a social worker and epidemiologist who has served at the intersection of behavioral and public health for over 15 years. Prior to joining SAMHSA in 2019, he supported State and Federal public health capacity at the U. S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) as an instructor and Field Supervisor for post-doctoral fellows enrolled in the Epidemic Intelligence Service. CAPT King previously served for over 10 years on the National Asthma Surveillance Team in the National Center for Environmental Health where his interests focused on chronic disease surveillance, environmental exposure and hazard assessment, and disaster mental health. As a Commissioned Officer in the U.S. Public Health Service, CAPT King deploys routinely following disasters and has had the privilege to lead one of five national Mental Health Response teams (Team 5) that provide crisis counseling and technical assistance to medically-underserved populations, with a focus on emergency public health response.

 

Objectives

  1. List important past disease outbreaks with pandemic potential that had important Behavioral Health impacts.

  2. Describe Behavioral Health interventions and response efforts implemented during past outbreaks and during the current pandemic.

  3. Identify common disaster stressors, reactions, and triggers.

  4. Construct a well-defined pandemic self-care plan.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

Game Plan: A Clinician’s Guide to Helping Men

Achieve Emotional Fitness

Alan Lyme

Abstract
This is an interactive presentation for anyone who works with and would like to have a better understanding of men and how to help them. Participants will be challenged to examine assumptions and societal roles in male risk and recurrence factors, through media use and storytelling. Anger, intimacy, trust, relationship issues, and the efficacy of integrative and alternative therapies will be explored.

 

Objectives

  1. Review the societal biases and “environment of risk” affecting males in resiliency, addiction onset, recurrence, and recovery.

  2. Underline the efficacy of a compassionate approach in working with men.

Addiction, Personality Disorders, and Trauma

Donna Johnson

Abstract
Working with substance use disorders also requires professionals to address other disorders common with substance use disorders.  This training will focus on addiction, personality disorders and trauma and will provide information on assessment and multi-modality treatment models.  We will also discuss new information around brain -based treatment and how this approach can provide treatment alternatives. Personality disorders have historically been challenging for professionals. This training will discuss ways to reframe personality disorders and recommended treatment.  Trauma, assessment and treatment models will also be discussed and featured.  This training will be interactive with discussions, break-out groups and power-point slides. Attendees will gain information to provide better treatment outcomes and gain an understanding of why these three disorders are often present with individuals. 

Objectives

  1. Understand why addiction, personality disorders and trauma are often present with individuals.

  2. Assessment tools to identify these disorders.

  3. Understanding Evidenced Based Models of Treatment for these. 

  4. Why we need to reframe how we have generally viewed personality disorders.

  5. Why addiction and trauma are often co-occurring based on brain- based therapy.

  6. Better understand the recovery process.

Prevention Across the Lifespan

Julie Stevens

Abstract

Unlike many public health issues, the prevention of substance use and abuse has been done in silos.  This workshop examines the issues related to altering the "silo" approach so that "conception-to-grave” substance abuse prevention can be implemented.

This workshop offers information that is foundational to a proper understanding of Lifespan issues including such important topics as human growth and development, brain development, the impact of substances on the brain at various stages of development, and strategies to address service provision issues. 

Objectives

  1. Understand the need for providing substance abuse prevention across the lifespan and outside of “silos.”

  2. Understand the complex interaction of human growth and development, brain development, effects of drugs on the brain and the body, and critical life transitions.

  3. Investigate and consider appropriate ways to provide services to "under-served" age populations.

Addiction Medicine Education and

Consultation in the Hospital 

Brandy Mathews and Jessica Marshal

Abstract
The opioid crisis reaches all aspects of the healthcare system. Overdose and infections are common reasons for hospitalization among persons with opioid use disorder (OUD). Historically, underlying substance use disorders have not been systematically addressed with evidence-based pharmacotherapy during inpatient hospitalizations. There is also a knowledge gap as few providers received comprehensive education in diagnosis and management of opioid use disorders during training. Inpatient addiction consultation services have been established in multiple hospitals to address these critical clinical and education gaps. The University of Kentucky Addiction Consult and Education Service (ACES) provides comprehensive substance use disorder clinical care including management of pharmacotherapy for OUD, overdose education and naloxone distribution, education to prevent injection-related infections, and coordination of continuing treatment after discharge. In addition, ACES trains medical and other health professions students in diagnosis and management of substance use disorders. We will present the goals, structure, and clinical and educational activities of ACES as well as describe early successes, and barriers and facilitators to establishing inpatient addiction consult services. 

Objectives

  1. Identify the need for and goals of an inpatient addiction consult service.

  2. Define the services delivered and essential staff roles.

  3. Describe multidisciplinary educational activities focused on evidence-based treatment of substance use disorders.

  4. Consider barriers and facilitators to establishing inpatient addiction consult services.

Lunch Keynote 

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Putting a Spotlight on "Hidden Treasures" in Prevention Research

Dr. Jason Kilmer​

Abstract

Most of know “the big studies” that are out there related to alcohol, cannabis, other substances, or other risk behaviors, but what about the hidden treasures that have huge implications for prevention and intervention efforts?  In this lunchtime keynote, we will explore potentially lesser known studies (the “hidden treasures”) with relevance to the work we do, and reflect on why science (and prevention) matter so much.

Objectives

  • Participants will understand the role balanced-placebo design studies have played in advancing the science behind alcohol’s effects.

  • Participants will understand the science surrounding “alcohol myopia” and what this means for prevention.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

Everything You Know About Addiction Treatment Marketing is Wrong

Nick Jaworski

Abstract
As we all know, many people who need treatment are often unwilling to seek it. This makes effective marketing and outreach extremely important as good marketing encourages people to seek help before the problem escalates further. In this workshop, participants will learn the key factors relating to objective, audience, messaging, and platform choice, and budgeting as it relates to marketing services as well as encouraging positive behaviors through PSAs. 


Objectives

  1. Identify common mistakes made when marketing addiction treatment.

  2. Implement effective marketing techniques and messaging that help people connect to treatment.

Clarifying the Role of Prevention Practitioners in Preventing Opioid Misuse and/or Overdose 

Chuck Klevgaard

Abstract

As we prepare for the spring of 2021, we will have been dealing with two public health crises at the same time for over a year. Increased social isolation, ravages to our economy and surges in depression have led to increased overdose rates in many parts of the country. The resources to fight both epidemics has created fatigue for many of us in the field.  The need to focus on prevention of overdose has never been more important and addressing upstream approaches takes a multi-channel effort and requires collaboration. This session will provide an overview of factors known to elevate individuals’ risk for opioid overdose, introduce strategies shown to lower that risk, and outline opportunities to engage new partners in the development of a culturally relevant comprehensive approach.

Objectives

  1. Understand a public health approach for addressing opioid misuse and overdose​.

  2. Describe strategies that have shown promise in reducing opioid misuse and/or overdose​.

  3. Describe the roles for prevention practitioners as catalysts for ensuring a culturally relevant comprehensive prevention approach. 

An Introduction to Sexual Diversity,

Gender Identity and Gender Expression

Ed Johnson

 

Abstract

The hidden minority of Lesbian, Gay and Bisexual individuals come into treatment with issues related to shame and trauma above and beyond that which non-LGB patient present with.  Transgender and Gender Non-Conforming Individuals have an additional  level of issues.  With both groups, these compounding issues, when left unaddressed result in unsuccessful outcomes.  This didactic session will increase participant’s knowledge of the issues related to sexual and gender minorities.

 

Objectives

  1. Discuss the differences between sex, gender, gender identity and sexual orientation.

  2. Become familiar with Gender Dysphoria and its implications in treatment.

  3. List 2 manifestations of Minority Stress for LGBTQ Individuals

  4. List 3 ways of becoming a more Trans Positive treatment center.

 

Behavioral Health Integration Within Properly Resourced Primary Care Clinics To Effectively Promote

Substance Use and Addiction Prevention Outcomes

Dr. George Patrin

 

Abstract

Primary Care “Patient-Centered Medical Homes” are, ideally, integrated with Behavioral Health personnel, either physically or virtually, to promote timely patient-centered procedures rather than those based on productivity-centered business processes between competing facilities and teams. This perpetuates inefficient and costly healthcare delivery with unsatisfactory outcomes. Business-centered clinics often, in reality, promote throughput, productivity, rather than health outcomes. Mental health conditions, to include substance abuse and addictions, first present in Primary Care, if those clinics are based on relationships and holistic evaluations, to include screening for these issues. Integration of training, processes, procedures, and payment systems are needed to support population-based staffing and room resourcing. Productivity-centered processes must give way to prevention wherein the person requires fewer appointments, not more, if we are to set integrated medical homes up for success to promote prevention and health, rather than sick care, shutting the revolving door of readmissions for mental health and addiction crises. A cultural shift in resourcing and training is required to accomplish this transformation.

A case study demonstrates how properly resourced healthcare teams in terms of staffing, space, and training, are set up for success and best outcomes. Resourcing of community population-based Primary Care Patient-Centered Medical Homes based on a 2002 DoD Research Study is reviewed. The “Patient-Centered Medical Home” model is presented as an effective integrated system of care with Behavioral Health personnel actively present, either physically or virtually. Procedures centered on the person (patient) supported by trusted Family (Friends) are highlighted providing for timely case management and care coordination from primary care to specialty services and back again. To understand the shift needed from fee-for-service to capitated value-based health outcomes, capacity gaps and process transformation is discussed to enable truly patient-centered, family-directed integrated healthcare delivery focused on prevention of illness.

 

Objectives

  1. List the ideal resourcing of a Primary Care “Patient-Centered Medical Home,” including integrated Behavioral Health and Prevention Personnel, to effectively promote prevention.

  2. Describe how integrated Community Clinic procedures can be made person-centered rather than business-centered, increasing efficiency of healthcare outcomes and decreased recidivism.

  3. Explain how community-population-based staffing and room resourcing addresses capacity gaps, setting up the integrated medical home for success in promoting prevention and healthcare, rather than perpetual crisis care.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

Risk and Protective Factor Framework:  

Fostering Resiliency in Kids

Julie Stevens

Abstract
Despite overwhelming adversity, many children successfully manage to bounce back and become healthy, productive adults.  The foundation of health promotion and prevention is evidence-based risk and protective factor research.  This workshop will discuss those factors that put children at risk, and those that promote resiliency.

Objectives

  1. Upon successful completion of this training participants will be able to:

  2. Define evidence-based prevention.

  3. Describe Risk and Protective Factors Theory of substance abuse prevention, the Resiliency Approach, and the Developmental Assets Framework.

  4. Discuss Protective Factors and Social Development Strategy.

  5. Enhance a prevention program using these prevention principles.

Faith Factor: Strategies for Effective Engagement

in Faith Based Recovery

Dr. Monty Burks, Jaime Harper, and Will Taylor

Abstract

Recovery support services/ministry work by using a best practice model that directly connects them with state and local initiatives. The goal is to build more recovery-conducive communities utilizing natural/organic resources.

Objectives

  1. Explain how the Tennessee Community Faith Based Initiative and the Lifeline Peer Project connect the continuum of care across the state.

  2. Explore the different types of trainings that can help Faith Based Organizations. 

  3. Recognize the benefits of building strong partnerships with the faith community as well as helping the faith community increase its capacity to combat addiction and mental health issues. 

Psychopharmacology 2021

Dr. Merrill Norton

Abstract

The primary purpose of this workshop is to bring to the participants the latest pharmaceutical applications to the diagnostics of the DSM 5. Many of our patients take medications to function at their highest level of success, but psychotropics do present adverse drug effects and monitoring is required. An overview of counselor monitoring for medication efficacy will be discussed. The workshop will also highlight the body of knowledge of psychotropic medications including the latest anti-depressants, anti-psychotics, anti-anxiety, mood stabilizers, psycho-stimulants, and herbal psychotropic. A recent review of the latest research in the neurobiology of anxiety, and depression.

 

Objectives:

1. Discuss and identify classes of drugs used to treat the spectrum of mental disorders;

2. Evaluate the latest medications used to treat MDD, GAD, and PTSD;

3. Outline the neurobiology of anxiety, depression, and psychotic disorders;

4. Discuss the most recent advances in drug therapies in the mental health and substance use treatment fields

The Relationship Between Trauma and Addiction

Ed Johnson

 Abstract

Unaddressed trauma is one of the key factors in unsuccessful treatment outcomes. This session will explore the relationship between trauma and addiction, why being trauma informed  is important in treatment settings and issues that are critical in the healing process for trauma survivors with substance use disorders. 

 

Objectives

  1. List 2 effects trauma has on the brain.

  2. Discuss 3 ways to include early and respectful trauma screening and assessment.

  3. List the five principles of trauma informed care.

Tuesday, May 18, 2021
 

Opening Keynote

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

 

Understanding the Mechanisms of

Addiction and Recovery

Dr. Carlo DiClemente

Abstract
This workshop will explore several current challenges to our understanding of prevention and intervention with individuals experiencing substance use disorders. The first involves understanding important tasks and processes involved in initiation and recovery.  The second focuses on developing an understanding of use disorders that goes beyond DSM-5 symptoms and focuses on a multidimensional comprehensive view of substance use behavior and how it becomes enmeshed in the life of the individual and difficult to change. The third is to examine the client contribution to recovery and the mechanisms or processes of change involved in recovery highlighting the difference between client contribution and the role of treatment.  The fourth is an exploration of the role of impaired self-regulation in recovery and some ideas of how to support self-control.

Objectives

  1. Describe the key tasks of each of the stages of change and how they function in becoming addicted and recovery.

  2. Describe the three critical components of use disorders: neuroadaptation, impaired self-regulation, and salience or narrowing of the behavioral repertoire.

  3. Understand and identify client mechanisms that need to be activated in adequately completing the key tasks of recovery and the differences in process activity during early and later stages of recovery.

  4. Consider how “scaffolding” can be used to support self-control and self-regulation.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

10:15 a.m. - 11:45 a.m.

The Role of DWI Courts, Technology, and Treatment in Supervising the Impaired-Driving Population 

Tara Casanova Powell

Abstract

As technology evolves to be more effective and efficient, jurisdictions are utilizing these devices to provide 24/7 monitoring for the impaired-driving population. Current technology available, the evolution of technology, and how technology is used to supervise impaired-driving offenders will be discussed. In addition, the research conducted to identify the effectiveness of various types of technology, and review of public opinion regarding the role technology plays in supervising impaired-driving offenders to ensure public safety will be provided.

 

Objectives

  1. Identify how pretrial services fit within the larger DUI system.

  2. Highlight common challenges and barriers that jurisdictions face at the pretrial phase.

  3. Identify key outcome measures.

  4. Illustrate how jurisdictions can efficiently collect program data to evaluate and improve programs and monitor offenders during the pretrial process.

  5. Provide characteristics of robust pretrial programs/processes; implementation considerations; and recommendations for success.

Visionary Prevention: Technology Marries

Prevention to Impact the Community

Susan Pitman

 

Abstract

This session will explore how a community discovered that providing universal screening using technology could impact an entire community in big ways:

• Create solid tools for prevention

• Provide data to enhance resource distribution, and

• Write a story the whole community could get behind

 

Objectives

  1. Gain an understanding of the analytical process/assessment of need at the community level,

  2. Discover numerous ways collaboration can result in meeting diverse community needs

  3. Increase insight into an assessment instrument’s agility using technology,

  4. See the breadth of impact that a low cost and easily accessible prevention strategy can have on reducing barriers and increasing access,

  5. Understand the difference in assessment and protocol and how web based SBIRT is both,

  6. Learn the benefit to the practitioner from a variety of perspectives,

  7. Recognize the opportunity to impact multiple agencies and work toward population-level change in attitude and behavior.

Relapse and Recycling: Successful Recovery

and Learning from the Past

Dr. Carlo DiClemente


Abstract

Some individuals may be able to stop or modify an addictive behavior the first time they try.  However, most make multiple attempts. Relapse is often used to label someone who has tried and not succeeded. Blame, shame, and a sense of failure often accompany “relapse”.  This presentation will examine the reality of relapse in all types of behavior change to change the conversation from relapse to recycling on the road to recovery. To address the reality of reoccurrence more effectively providers and clients need to understand that learning from failure is the road to successfully sustained change.

Objectives

  1. Understand relapse as occurring in many different chronic conditions like diabetes and heart disease.

  2. Identify relapse as a stigmatized term.

  3. Understand recycling as a normal part of trial-and-error learning.

  4. Learn new ways to work with clients in discussing and debriefing reoccurrence events to learn from errors.

Meaningful Media that Combines

Marketing & Mission

Nick Jaworski

Abstract

When most people think of marketing, they often think of snake oil salesmen selling some patent medicine cure-all. However, that is the exact opposite of good marketing. This misconception has created a tendency for providers to feel uncomfortable doing marketing when, in fact, marketing needs to be an integral part of any provider's mission to serve and support. This workshop will educate participants on how marketing drives mission, supports patients, and helps programs attract patients, all at the same time.

 

Objectives

  1. Align marketing and mission.

  2. Create messaging that engages, educates, and build trust.

  3. Identify the most effective channels for your patient population.

Lunch Keynote                                                           

12:00 p.m. - 1:30 p.m.

Self Care in Healthcare

Mark Lundholm

Abstract

Tools, talent, tenacity and time. What it takes to reach the defiant client, assist the uninformed family and address the tendency to “coast” as professional healer. This one will stay with you forever. 

Mark has performed in all 50 states and 10 foreign countries. From world-renowned musicians, heads of state, fortune 500 companies to rehabilitation centers and convicted felons, Mark has truly entertained on the world's stage. He's appeared on Comedy Central, Showtime, A&E, CBS, and NBC. Mark wrote and performed his own one-man show off-Broadway in New York City reaching critical acclaim, and in his spare time created the now staple DVD series 'Humor in Treatment' and the Recovery Board Game.

*This session will contain adult related humor.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

1:45 p.m. - 3:15 p.m.

The Not-So-Strange-Bedfellows: Prevention and Insurance

Susan Pitman

Abstract

This session examines the way a community coalition’s Poly-Drug Task Force attracted the attention of insurance companies resulting in emerging strategies that are changing the entire region. At the core of the vision: “Individuals will be healthier when prevention and wellness programs are accessible and available in their workplace, through their health provider, and in their communities.”

Objectives

  1. Get a look at the development and process engaged by the Poly-Drug Task Force to attract and include policy makers, business-people, and insurers

  2. Determine the elements necessary for mutual cooperation and clarity of roles

  3. Examine helpful tools to create the opportunity for partnership

  4. Gain an understanding of the fiscal potential for insurers, employers, and insureds

  5. Understand the real timeline of change and the impact of reaching the tipping point

  6. Know how to map the next steps to think creatively upstream to improve your community’s behavioral health

Building a Village – The Art of Cultivating Effective Community Supports

James Campbell

Abstract

During this season, many individuals have struggled with a sense of isolation. In addition, community support and engagement has seemed elusive for many. The pervasive strain on connection has posed unique challenges related to prevention, treatment, and recovery. Building a Village is a practical exploration of protective measures and community resources through the lens of our contemporary environment. Ways to leverage these factors to help prevent substance use disorders and to aid those we serve and our programs and services in developing positive support for recovery within our communities will be emphasized.

Objectives

1. Identify three systemic challenges for those with substance use disorders as well as the systemic supports needed for healthy recovery.

2. List three supports that are available in our communities.

3. Verbalize strategies to assist those we serve in identifying and accessing community supports.

4. Articulate ways that addiction professionals can partner in building support for prevention and recovery-based services and programs in their community and become an effective advocate for recovery.

An Introduction to Screening, Brief Intervention, and Referral to Treatment (SBIRT)

Dr. Jason Kilmer

Abstract

On top of identifying people who might otherwise “slip through the cracks” through screening, opportunities to address other co-occurring issues and risks exist.  In this workshop, screening options for alcohol and cannabis/marijuana will be reviewed, as will the theory behind (and steps involved) in brief interventions that utilizing motivational interviewing in their delivery.  Strategies to boost follow-up after referrals, including “warm handoffs,” will be described. 

Objectives 

  • Participants will identify a “gold standard” screening option for high risk alcohol use and cannabis use

  • Participants will understand the theory behind and steps involved in a brief intervention informed by motivational interviewing

 Addressing Stigma and Barriers to Treatment for Patients with Substance Use Disorder

Brandy Mathews and Jessica Marshal

Abstract
The opioid crisis reaches all aspects of the healthcare system. Overdose and infections are common reasons for hospitalization among persons with opioid use disorder (OUD). Historically, underlying substance use disorders have not been systematically addressed with evidence-based pharmacotherapy during inpatient hospitalizations. There is also a knowledge gap as few providers received comprehensive education in diagnosis and management of opioid use disorders during training. Inpatient addiction consultation services have been established in multiple hospitals to address these critical clinical and education gaps.


In this session we will discuss stigma and challenges to getting patients into treatment in more detail.

 

Objectives

  1. Describe stigma surrounding patents with substance use disorder. 

  2. Discuss barriers to caring for patients with substance use disorder in the hospital setting.

  3. Describe clinical staff attitudes and educational needs and discuss tactics to address.

  4. Describe barriers and stigma in the community setting that negatively impact ability to treat.

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

3:30 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

The Role of Prevention Practitioners in

Addressing and Reducing Stigma 

Chuck Klevgaard


 
Abstract
Stigma disproportionately influences health outcomes and mental well-being for individuals with mental health or substance use disorder (SUD). Fear of being judged and/or discriminated against can prevent people from getting the help they need. Stigma is complex due to various societal and research definitions, including the fact that it comes in many different forms. Stigma is not limited to one setting or condition; rather, it is cross-cutting in all communities and populations. This workshop will describe strategies for working collaboratively across a variety of community sectors and introduce best practices for preventing and reducing stigma.
 
Objectives

  1. Describes common components and three levels of stigma.

  2. Describes the importance of using non-stigmatizing language.

  3. List cross-cutting and evidence-based practices for preventing or reducing stigma.

Pre-Trial Services: Key Components and Best Practice Recommendations for Alcohol Impaired Drivers

Tara Casanova Powell

Abstract
National leaders in the criminal justice system advocate early intervention. The sooner that impaired drivers can be assessed and connected with services, the better-informed decision-making will be throughout the justice process. How pretrial services fit within the larger DUI system will be discussed, and various pretrial programs currently implemented across the United States will be highlighted.

Objectives

1. Identify current technology available today to utilize within both traditional and DWI court jurisdictions to monitor the impaired driving population.
2. Provide context to implement certain applications/devices for strategies to supervise the impaired-driving population for various jurisdictions.

Loneliness: Clinical Observations

and Therapeutic Approaches 

Dr. Cardwell "CC" Nuckols

Abstract
Loneliness is both complex and multi-determined. It is not the same as depression although closely related. Loneliness is not the same as being a “private” person or a “loner”. Some people both desire, need and enjoy a lot of alone time. For others, loneliness is an all-consuming, painful experience.
Loneliness has no DSM 5 designation and no agreed upon set of diagnostic criteria. It is generally under-addressed in clinical settings and can be devastating to the patient. Loneliness causes physiological changes that both generate and complicate medical and psychiatric diseases and disorders. Isolation can also precipitate the initiation or exacerbation of existing alcohol and drug usage. Suicidal thoughts and behaviors will generally increase.
This “skills training” event will take a close look at loneliness- differential diagnostics (especially depression), health consequences and potential evidence-based treatments will be reviewed.

 

Objectives

  1. Discuss current research on the impact of social isolation on patient functioning and well-being (both medically and psychiatrically).

  2. Compare and contrast the experience of loneliness with the disorder of depression.

  3. Consider a range of psychotherapeutic and pharmacological interventions as loneliness is multi-determined.
     

Providing Pain and Substance Use Recovery

as a Patient-Centered (Family-Driven)

Integrated Healthcare Team:

How Do We Get There From Here?

Dr. George Patrin

Abstract

Primary Care “Patient-Centered Medical Homes” are, ideally, integrated with Behavioral Health personnel, either physically or virtually, to promote timely patient-centered procedures rather than those based on productivity-centered business processes between competing facilities and teams. This perpetuates inefficient and costly healthcare delivery with unsatisfactory outcomes. Business-centered clinics often, in reality, promote throughput, productivity, rather than health outcomes. Mental health conditions, to include substance abuse and addictions, first present in Primary Care, if those clinics are based on relationships and holistic evaluations, to include screening for these issues. Integration of training, processes, procedures, and payment systems are needed to support population-based staffing and room resourcing. Productivity-centered processes must give way to prevention wherein the person requires fewer appointments, not more, if we are to set integrated medical homes up for success to promote prevention and health, rather than sick care, shutting the revolving door of readmissions for mental health and addiction crises. A cultural shift in resourcing and training is required to accomplish this transformation.

A case study demonstrates how properly resourced healthcare teams in terms of staffing, space, and training, are set up for success and best outcomes. Resourcing of community population-based Primary Care Patient-Centered Medical Homes based on a 2002 DoD Research Study is reviewed. The “Patient-Centered Medical Home” model is presented as an effective integrated system of care with Behavioral Health personnel actively present, either physically or virtually. Procedures centered on the person (patient) supported by trusted Family (Friends) are highlighted providing for timely case management and care coordination from primary care to specialty services and back again. To understand the shift needed from fee-for-service to capitated value-based health outcomes, capacity gaps and process transformation is discussed to enable truly patient-centered, family-directed integrated healthcare delivery focused on prevention of illness.

 

Objectives

  1. Explain how an otherwise excellent healthcare program providing leading-edge treatments can result in poor outcomes if cultural issues and community practices aren’t understood and addressed when dealing with patients with drug addiction and pain management challenges dismissing masked disabilities and delaying definitive diagnosis, treatment, and rehabilitation (fitness for duty-return to work).

  2. Describe Patient-Centered and Family-Driven procedural changes a specialty network provider returning to the workplace can incorporate into program processes to maximize successful outcomes for patients with drug dependency, pain management, and/or depression issues to promote prevention and decreased recidivism by incorporating an integrated Primary Care approach for Patients (‘Wounded Warriors’) and their Families.

 
Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Concurrent Breakout Sessions

8:30 a.m. - 10:00 a.m.

Becoming Whole: The Journey

Dr. Cardwell "C.C." Nuckols

Abstract

The spiritual aspirant with faith, discipline, dedication and the grace of God or Higher Power can move toward “wholeness” and “inclusion”. This conversation will explore some of the questions and concepts encountered during your journey such as:

  • Why are we here on Earth?

  • Is there both good and bad in this world or is everything good?

  • As you grow toward wholeness, is life’s goal the achievement of bliss or the working through of struggles, trials and tribulations?

  • Is there something beyond the unitive state (often called enlightenment)?

  • If so, what is it and what does it look and feel like.

These questions tell us about our worldview and serve as an indirect measure of spiritual progression. As one moves from the worldview of grandiosity to gratitude (spiritual transformation), there is resultant changes in how we see the world. Let the questions serve as a challenge to enhance your spiritual, healing self.

Objectives

  • Discuss and understand the concept; “everything is ONE”

  • Discuss the spiritual movement toward unitive self (linear/nonlinear) and how this changes one’s worldview

  • Discuss how the emerging “flow” and “silence” found in spiritual transformation becomes “what is”

  • Describe a spiritual transformative state (egoless unitive state) entitled “No-Self”

To CBD or Not to CBD: That is the Question?

The Neuroscience of CBD Oils

Dr. Merrill Norton

Abstract

With the legalization of cannabis products (THC and CBD) for medical and recreational purposes in many states and with a majority of US citizens advocating for the legal right to consume these products, the use of THC and CBD products will increase and may impact the human brain in many ways. The human brain can experience multiple complications with regular use of cannabis products and the long-term effects of these complications are unknown. Are CBD oils beneficial or do they cause long term dysfunctions of the central nervous system?

 

Now we know CBD as cannabidiol, an organic compound derived from the hemp and cannabis plants. We find it in health food stores and other shops, in pills and tinctures, salves and creams, chocolate bars, honey sticks, energy bars, sleeping masks and coffee, among many other things. And as the CBD boom continues to crest, we will encounter the substance in increasingly more products and outlets. This presentation will introduce the audience to the neuroscience of CBD oils, their benefits, and adverse drug effects.

 

Objectives

1. Evaluate medical cannabinoid products and their beneficial potential and adverse effects;

2. Contrast the various legalization processes of medical cannabinoids in the US;

3. Formulate the profile of adverse drug effects of CBD oils.